Sour your soups with Romanian borscht

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When it comes to creating sour soups, nothing compares to the flavors of a borsch recipe! Unlike the Russian or Ukrainian borscht, this traditional Romanian borscht recipe is unique to our culture. Today, I am delighted to share a cherished family recipe that has been passed down for over 50 years.

Borscht recipe

Romanian Borscht recipe

We have a strong preference for tangy soups. In fact, we absolutely adore the intense sourness! When it comes to sour soups, nothing compares to the exquisite Romanian borscht recipe, which we have perfected in our own unique version.

We love including it because it adds a unique and delicious flavor that can’t be replicated by any other herb or spice. Plus, it helps with digestion and boosts metabolism.

Romanian borscht works great in virtually any soup but I think it’s an amazing pair for meatball soup, pork chop soup, chicken whole egg soup and turkey veggie soup.

What is Romanian borscht?

Romanian borscht is a traditional ingredient that has been enjoyed in Romania for generations. It is typically made with what bran, corn bran, rye bread and fresh yeast, and is used to create the famous sour flavor in soups. This ingredient adds a unique and delicious sour flavor that can’t be replicated by any other herb or spice.

Are there different types of borscht?

Yes, there are various types of borscht in Eastern European cuisine, such as Romanian, Russian and Ukrainian. Each type has its own unique taste and ingredients. However, the Romanian version stands out for its use of bran and fresh yeast to create that distinctive sour flavor.

How is Romanian borscht different than Ukrainian and Russian borscht?

The main difference between Romanian borscht and Ukrainian or Russian borscht is the ingredients. Ukrainian and Russian recipes are made with beets, giving the soup its iconic red color. Romanian borscht does not contain beets and instead focuses on creating a tangy flavor with the use of bran and yeast. Ukrainian and Russian recipes are actual soups while the Romanian version of the borscht recipe is an ingredient used in soups.

How long does it take to make Romanian borscht?

The process of making Romanian borscht can take between 24 hours to 2 weeks, as it requires fermenting the bran mixture. While 2 weeks may seem like a long time, the wait is definitely worth it for the unique and delicious flavor it adds to soups. Once the bran mixture is fermented, it can be stored in the fridge for future use.

How to make homemade borscht?

Ingredients:

  • 4 1/2 cups wheat bran
  • 5 cups corn bran
  • 34 cups boiled water
  • 2 slices rye bread
  • 1 1/2 tbsp fresh yeast

Directions:

  1. Place the wheat and corn bran together in a large ceramic pitcher.
  2. Pour the hot boiled water over the mixture and wait until it’s cool to the touch (slightly warmer than the room temperature).
  3. Drop the yeast in, crumbled into small pieces, and then add the rye bread. The water must not be hot as it will kill the yeast’s ferments.
  4. Next step is to cover the jar with a blanket to keep it warm and let it ferment for 24-48 hours. Usually after 24 hours the borsch is ready to use but leaving it longer gives it a stronger, richer taste. The bran gets deposited to the bottom of the jar while on top there’s a clear liquid with a pale white tint and sour in taste. The sourness also depends on the quality of the bran and yeast on top of the fermentation time.

Romanian borscht is a unique and delicious ingredient that adds a tangy flavor to soups. With just a few simple ingredients and some patience, you can create a jar of fermented bran mixture that will enhance any soup dish with its unique sour taste. Give it a try and see for yourself why Romanian borscht recipe is loved by so many!

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Romanian borscht recipe for sour soups

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Romanian borsch recipe

Discover the unique flavors of traditional Romanian borscht recipe in this cherished family recipe passed down for over 50 years.
Prep Time5 minutes
Cook Time1 day
Total Time1 day 5 minutes
Course: Soup
Cuisine: European
Keyword: borsch recipe, romanian borsch
Servings: 1 jar
Calories: 1379kcal
Author: Petro

Ingredients

  • 4 1/2 cups wheat bran
  • 5 cups corn bran
  • 34 cups boiled water
  • 2 slices rye bread
  • 1 1/2 tbsp fresh yeast

Equipment

  • large jar a pitcher or a bottle with wide neck
  • blanket

Instructions

  • Place the wheat bran and corn bran together in a large pitcher or jar.
  • Pour the hot boiled water over the mixture and wait until it's cool to the touch (slightly warmer than the room temperature).
  • Drop the yeast in, crumbled into small pieces, and then add the rye bread. The water must not be hot as it will kill the yeast's ferments.
  • Next step is to cover the jar with a blanket to keep it warm and let it ferment for 24-48 hours. Usually after 24 hours the borsch is ready to use but leaving it longer gives it a stronger, richer taste. The bran gets deposited to the bottom of the jar while on top there's a clear liquid with a pale white tint and sour in taste. The sourness also depends on the quality of the bran and yeast on top of the fermentation time.

Nutrition

Serving: 1jar | Calories: 1379kcal | Carbohydrates: 390g | Protein: 93g | Fat: 26g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 13g | Monounsaturated Fat: 5g | Sodium: 806mg | Potassium: 6741mg | Fiber: 241g | Sugar: 5g | Vitamin A: 54IU | Vitamin C: 0.3mg | Calcium: 694mg | Iron: 61mg
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ABOUT PETRO

Hi, I’m Petro, author and founder of Easy Peasy Creative Ideas. Sewist, crafter, avid DIY-er, foodie, photographer, homemaker and mommy to one. I’m an expert at coming up with quick, clever sewing tips, recycling crafts and simple, easy recipes! You can find my ideas featured in reputable publications such as Country Living, Good House Keeping, Yahoo News, WikiHow, Shutterfly, Parade, Brit & Co and more. Thanks for stopping by and hope you’ll stay for a while, get to know me better and come back another time. Stick around for real fun projects! Read more…

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5 Comments

  1. Akka, I always knew u had a cook inside u..Interesting recipe here and wish to see some of your recipes here :) Your deviled eggs recipe is still a hit in my blog :) Convey my regards to aunt also :)

    1. It is, in other countries like Ukraine or Russia.
      In Romania it’s a special “spice” we add to our soups to make them sour. Romanians love extreme sourness and you can see it on our grumpy faces, hehehe.

      xoxo